Helpful Links

Description of Services

Hearing

Children of school and preschool age are screened for hearing problems at regular intervals by the MDHHS-trained hearing technician.  The screenings are conducted in the schools and by appointment at the Health Department as needed.  School hearing screenings are provided annually to children in preschool, kindergarten, grades 2, 4, and 6.   A limited number of hearing screenings may be provided at the Health Department during the summer months. 

Any other children age 3 or older, who are referred to the program by a parent, teacher, or school nurse because of a suspected hearing problem will also be screened. 

The technicians who perform hearing screenings are trained and evaluated by the Michigan Department Health & Human Services to properly administer the tests.

When a child does not pass a hearing screen, parents will be notified to take their child to a physician for follow-up.

Most of the hearing losses found in this program are in the mild to low-moderate range of severity.  The physician will often find an external or middle ear problem to explain these losses and offer corrective treatment.  Children with moderate losses, or worse, often have a permanent inner ear component even if external or middle ear pathology is identified.  These children may require extensive otological, audiological and educational evaluation. 

Children may qualify for Children's Special Health Care Services Program.


Vision

Children of school and preschool age are screened for vision problems at regular intervals by the MDHHS-trained vision technician.  The screenings are conducted in the schools and by appointment at the Health Department as needed.  School vision screenings are provided annually to children in preschool, and grades 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9.   A limited number of vision screenings are provided at the Health Department during the summer months. 

Any other children age 3 or older, who are referred to the program by a parent, teacher, or school nurse because of a suspected vision problem will also be screened. 

The technicians who perform vision screenings are trained and evaluated by the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services to properly administer the tests.

At initial testing and/or re-testing, children who are unable to pass one or more exercises which screen for muscle imbalance, visual acuity and farsightedness are referred to an eye doctor of the family's choice.  Children who display symptoms of strabismus, ptosis, nystagmus, or anisocoria are also referred to an eye doctor and to Children' Special Health Care Services program.